Don’t Be Afraid to Show Your Strengths

It is better to be the most you that you can be than to worry about how it makes others think of you.

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Photo by Vicky Sim on Unsplash

Sometimes it is harder to be strong than to just be.

Marianne Williamson, in her poem Our Deepest Fear, covers this rather succinctly:

For me, this was something I came to understand when I first started working with energy.

In my mid-twenties I started to explore doing various types of energy work. While I am well aware that many people are really skeptical of this entire notion, I have had enough experiences with it on different levels to believe. It goes right alongside everything lumped into the sixth sense — extra-sensory perception including telepathy, empathic reading, mediumship, all things truly psychic, and energy manipulation.

Since beginning to work with energy, I had an innate understanding of the idea. To help focus my usage of energy work, I was introduced to Reiki.

Reiki, if you are not familiar with it, is taking Universal energy (which is all around us at all times) and channeling it into the body to heal with touch and/or working remotely and working in the aura but not touching the body.

While some people call this hooky-spooky bullshit, I have experienced it for myself and made use of it for my personal healing from injuries.

Reiki is just one aspect of what I perceive of my ability to do energy work. For some time, though, I feared to show just how adept at this I truly am.

Why does strength scare people?

There are any number of examples out there of people being afraid of strength. But this is not just the notion of bullies or someone strong holding back someone weak. This also gets applied in more abstract ways.

For example, anti-intellectualism. We used to look to smart people like scientists and teachers to shape policy and public discourse about things like vaccines, climate-change, and education. Now those people are reviled, disregarded as elitist alarmists, and questioned unreasonably by people with strongly-help opinions based on faith or who-knows-what.

The strong-minded are scary because they challenge certain sectors of influence in our society, and have lost much of the practical support they used to have. But this is a perfect example of how strength scares people.

You also see a lot of this in popular culture. How many movies and TV shows feature someone “brainy” dumbing themselves down to be unintimidating to gain popularity? Strength in many forms scares people.

Why? I don’t have an answer, but I can make a few educated guesses.

Jealousy. The strong have something others want. The jealousy of that is where the fear comes into play.

Judgment. I think some people are afraid because they think those stronger than them, whatever form that takes, will judge them as unworthy. That can be scary because it can lead to rejection, which most people want to avoid.

Abuse. As a part of our fear-based society, we are frequently seeing abuses of power. All you have to do is look to President Trump for Exhibit A. Someone viewed as possessing “strength” abusing it, and I know I am certainly concerned about what will come of it.

Overall it comes down to fear.

The question is — whose strength do you fear?

On the one hand, you are presented with this strength, real or perceived, from an outside source to be afraid of. But on the other hand — what if the real fear is your own strength, and what you might do with it?

When I was in middle school, I began as a pretty unpopular kid. I didn’t have many friends, and I did my geeky things and largely kept to myself. Until 8th grade, I was still an ‘A’ student.

But then that kid who interacts between all social strata — you know, the kid who everybody likes and wants to be like, no matter if they are jock, geek, nerd, or what-have-you? He started to talk to me and drew me into a group of people. Suddenly…I wasn’t the outcast I had been.

In the interest of being social, I backed off my academics. My ‘A’ work became ‘B’ work because it was an easy ‘B’ for me. Though I graduated High School with a ‘B’ average, potentially I could have been more.

But my fear of showing my strength of mind and alienating my friends held me back. Unfortunately, this is only a first example of this happening. More than once my fear of rejection or abandonment held me back from taking potentially life-changing steps.

This is just an example from my life. But it illustrates the point that fearing your own strength and the consequences of showing it can be unfortunate.

Right now a lot of strong people are holding back in order to play it safe. But the consequence of this has the potential to be devastating.

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Photo by Clark Young on Unsplash

To change the world you have to begin at home

Literally, you have to begin with yourself. If you are not who, where, or what you desire to be, that is probably not making you very content or happy. Further, if you are holding back in regards to your strength to protect yourself or those around you, you’re actually making matters worse.

Too many people don’t take on the things that would and could empower them. This is why the collective consciousness of our society is fear-based, and battles that seemed to be won a decade or two ago are in full-swing still. Many of these people are stronger than they accept themselves to be, and hold back as such.

You are worthy and deserving of sharing your strength, your gifts, with the world. If you are holding back because you fear consequences, have you considered what the outcome of expressing your full strength might be? What if you push people away who do not support you, but in the process draw in new people who ARE supportive?

The fear-base of our society tends to cause us to look first to the down-side of a situation. We “what if” the matter, and go first to worst-case scenarios. But when you use the strengths you have, you open yourself to a number of up-sides, can look to the potential and possibility of the matter, and go first to the best-case scenarios.

This isn’t a Pollyanna attitude, but it does require applying some optimism. I believe if more people worked for their strengths rather than against their weaknesses, the collective consciousness could shift more positive.

Don’t be afraid to show your strength

With the number of people who see mediocrity as good enough, I think it is super important to show the strengths we have. In especial because when you are the best you that you can be, you open yourself to growth, and change. Showing your strength also can provide guidance to others.

Showing the gifts you have is not selfish, or arrogant, or bombastic. You are not a bad person if you happen to be better at something or stronger than another. That’s a part of human nature, folks, and rather than fear it, we should celebrate it.

Life is not a competition. Real competition only exists in athletics. There is enough good in this world for everyone, and you are worthy and deserving of claiming yours. Being the strongest you that you can be is one way to do just that.

I believe if more people were mindful of the here-and-now, and took on their own empowerment, the fear-base of our society would be eroded, and open to being replaced by a reason-base. I know that’s an optimistic appraisal, but that doesn’t cause me to believe it any less.

It is better to be the most you that you can be than to worry about how it makes others think of you. Be strong, be smart, be kind, and go for it.

You are worthy and deserving of using your mindfulness to find and/or create the reality in which you desire to live. When all is said and done you matter, and you should share all of your strengths and gifts with the world.

Here are my Five Easy Steps to Change the World for the Better.

Written by

I am a practitioner of mindfulness, positivity, philosophy, & conscious reality creation. I love to inspire, open minds, & entertain. http://www.mjblehart.com

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